In a Galaxy Far Far Away…

 

Recently, scientists have discovered seven new planets that have the potential to be seven new earths. Perhaps someday, students may go there.

The seven new earths vary in size and environment, orbiting around a dwarf star. This new system is 39 light years away from our own, and many scientists are getting very excited about this discovery. The system has seven planets in total, and three have water. However, with all of the news about scientists performing expensive government experiments to study new worlds, the thought of students visiting other planets for knowledge is often overlooked.

“I want to explore the outer reaches of space,” sophomore Xavier Koehl said. “I would explore to find new life.”

With all of the science classes teaching with pictures and videos, new planets may give students something that has never been available before: a chance to see science in action. New layers of soil, developing plants and, above all, new life would give students the learning experience of a lifetime.

“They would get to see a whole new environment besides the one they have known their entire life,” sophomore Jackson Corbin said.

The hard question of leaving earth to study another planet should also be analyzed. This could be the trip of a lifetime, so the opportunity should not be missed.

“There could be a new element, mineral, or possibly even life that we don’t know about,” Corbin said.

However, there is one last query to be addressed; should we focus on helping our own earth or exploring for new earths?

“We haven’t even explored the depths of our ocean,” Koehl said. “We should figure out what is going on here before exploring other planets.”

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s